tamarinne: (Default)

"Little, Big" by John Crowley.  This book just made me more and more frustrated the longer I read.  It's an interesting world with lovely writing, but it's populated by 2-dimensional archetypes and no plot.  I doggedly kept reading because (A) the world was cool and (B) something had to happen, sooner or later.  Right?  About 500 pages into it, when I had already suppressed the urge to throw it across the room half a dozen times, one of the "characters" is writing for a soap opera and is thinking about about how interesting the soap opera is as a structure, because it just keeps going on and on and never ends and never comes to any kind of resolution and I thought "if you are actually talking about this book I will KILL YOU DEAD."  Finally, FINALLY, something happened on page 700?  or thereabouts?  and took approximately 30 seconds to read.  And then the book was over.  I set the book down and thought "it took you 700 pages of maundering to get to THAT?  THEY ALL TURN  INTO FAIRIES????  Really??????   Oh, and PS, why did you kill the only character I cared about even a little?   That was unnecessary on so many levels!  You're just trying to make me care about the ending of this awful book!  But it's not going to work!  Your book is still terrible!"    I cannot believe this book won the world fantasy award.  Although, upon reflection, I can believe it.  I'm sure it was the same bunch of yahoos who gave the award to Mythago Wood, which was infuriatingly awful in much the same way.     Oh, John Crowley.  I shan't be reading any more books by you.  Not one more.  And when I get home tonight I'm going to throw out any books of yours that are sitting unread on my shelf. 
tamarinne: (Default)

"Little, Big" by John Crowley.  This book just made me more and more frustrated the longer I read.  It's an interesting world with lovely writing, but it's populated by 2-dimensional archetypes and no plot.  I doggedly kept reading because (A) the world was cool and (B) something had to happen, sooner or later.  Right?  About 500 pages into it, when I had already suppressed the urge to throw it across the room half a dozen times, one of the "characters" is writing for a soap opera and is thinking about about how interesting the soap opera is as a structure, because it just keeps going on and on and never ends and never comes to any kind of resolution and I thought "if you are actually talking about this book I will KILL YOU DEAD."  Finally, FINALLY, something happened on page 700?  or thereabouts?  and took approximately 30 seconds to read.  And then the book was over.  I set the book down and thought "it took you 700 pages of maundering to get to THAT?  THEY ALL TURN  INTO FAIRIES????  Really??????   Oh, and PS, why did you kill the only character I cared about even a little?   That was unnecessary on so many levels!  You're just trying to make me care about the ending of this awful book!  But it's not going to work!  Your book is still terrible!"    I cannot believe this book won the world fantasy award.  Although, upon reflection, I can believe it.  I'm sure it was the same bunch of yahoos who gave the award to Mythago Wood, which was infuriatingly awful in much the same way.     Oh, John Crowley.  I shan't be reading any more books by you.  Not one more.  And when I get home tonight I'm going to throw out any books of yours that are sitting unread on my shelf. 

Bread

Feb. 25th, 2010 02:01 pm
tamarinne: (science!)
Have I really not posted about this before???

Over the holidays, we tried out some bread at Tom & Meredith's from the cookbook "Artisan Bread In 5 Minutes A Day". We liked it so much we told Rick's mom about it, and she surprised us with a copy of the book a few days later.

This book has seriously changed my relationship with home-made bread. We now pretty much only eat warm, fresh-made bread, even after long days at work. We're contemplating getting rid of the bread machine, because it does not hold a candle to the bread we can make from this cookbook, plus the machine takes longer. The bread is crusty on the outside, chewy on the inside, and the dough keeps in the refrigerator for weeks.  You can make as much or as little as you want at one time (one naan, or two rolls, or an entire loaf).

An article describing the basic recipe and the process is here, and if you're interested in buying the cookbook, it's here.

Highly recommended.

Bread

Feb. 25th, 2010 02:01 pm
tamarinne: (science!)
Have I really not posted about this before???

Over the holidays, we tried out some bread at Tom & Meredith's from the cookbook "Artisan Bread In 5 Minutes A Day". We liked it so much we told Rick's mom about it, and she surprised us with a copy of the book a few days later.

This book has seriously changed my relationship with home-made bread. We now pretty much only eat warm, fresh-made bread, even after long days at work. We're contemplating getting rid of the bread machine, because it does not hold a candle to the bread we can make from this cookbook, plus the machine takes longer. The bread is crusty on the outside, chewy on the inside, and the dough keeps in the refrigerator for weeks.  You can make as much or as little as you want at one time (one naan, or two rolls, or an entire loaf).

An article describing the basic recipe and the process is here, and if you're interested in buying the cookbook, it's here.

Highly recommended.

Book Joy!

Feb. 7th, 2007 12:28 pm
tamarinne: (Default)

So I finally remembered today that I'd been meaning to ask [profile] alexx_kay if he knew of a readily available unabridged translation of Orlando Innamorato, since the last time I went looking I could only find an abridged version that cut out all the bits I wanted to read about (essentially, anything with Bradamante in it).  So I went looking on amazon to see if I could find the abridged version to reference in my email to him, and instead I found this!!!  Unabridged!!!  SQUEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!

(Plus, now I've finally got an excuse to buy this too - it's got recipes with notes on them that say things like, "Haroun al Raschid ate this one all the time."  !!!!!! I mean, !!!!!!   And then I got this Borges book I've had my eye on, and a Georgette Heyer...)

*pant pant pant*  OK.  Book frenzy over.  Whew!

 

Book Joy!

Feb. 7th, 2007 12:28 pm
tamarinne: (Default)

So I finally remembered today that I'd been meaning to ask [profile] alexx_kay if he knew of a readily available unabridged translation of Orlando Innamorato, since the last time I went looking I could only find an abridged version that cut out all the bits I wanted to read about (essentially, anything with Bradamante in it).  So I went looking on amazon to see if I could find the abridged version to reference in my email to him, and instead I found this!!!  Unabridged!!!  SQUEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!

(Plus, now I've finally got an excuse to buy this too - it's got recipes with notes on them that say things like, "Haroun al Raschid ate this one all the time."  !!!!!! I mean, !!!!!!   And then I got this Borges book I've had my eye on, and a Georgette Heyer...)

*pant pant pant*  OK.  Book frenzy over.  Whew!

 

tamarinne: (Default)
Cross-posted to [profile] bookfind

I'm looking for a book for which I have the following description:

A "choose your own adventure" type children's storybook which would have been written and published sometime between 1900-1930.  It was hardback, set and very likely produced in England and was about a girl and a boy searching the local countryside for buried treasure, with "go to page such and such" story options at the end of each page.

If anyone even has a suggestion for places where I could try to track this down, it would be much appreciated!   (For that matter, if anyone knows of any "choose your own adventure" type books or plays that date back more than fifty years heck, earlier than the late 70's/early 80's, those would be helpful too.)
tamarinne: (Default)
Cross-posted to [profile] bookfind

I'm looking for a book for which I have the following description:

A "choose your own adventure" type children's storybook which would have been written and published sometime between 1900-1930.  It was hardback, set and very likely produced in England and was about a girl and a boy searching the local countryside for buried treasure, with "go to page such and such" story options at the end of each page.

If anyone even has a suggestion for places where I could try to track this down, it would be much appreciated!   (For that matter, if anyone knows of any "choose your own adventure" type books or plays that date back more than fifty years heck, earlier than the late 70's/early 80's, those would be helpful too.)

ooo, baby!

Aug. 24th, 2006 11:22 am
tamarinne: (Default)

The internet is for library porn... 

(yes, this is completely work safe.  "What I'm talking about here is the full-frontal objectification of the library itself.  Oh yeah.")

ooo, baby!

Aug. 24th, 2006 11:22 am
tamarinne: (Default)

The internet is for library porn... 

(yes, this is completely work safe.  "What I'm talking about here is the full-frontal objectification of the library itself.  Oh yeah.")

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